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TIL: auditTime’s Completion Behaviour Is Unlike debounceTime’s

April 28, 2020 • 2 minute read

End
Photo by Markus Spiske on Unsplash

The debounceTime and auditTime operators are similar, but different. Each operator ignores intermediate next notifications for a specified duration — that defines a time window — and then emits the most-recently-received value when that duration elapses.

The fundamental difference is that debounceTime resets the its internal timer whenever a next notification that is received within the time window and auditTime time does not.

These marble diagrams show the difference:

debounceTime without completion

auditTime without completion

With debounceTime, the timer is started when a is received and is reset when b is received, so the emission of b is delayed by the specified number of milliseconds.

With auditTime, the timer is started when a is received and is not reset when b is received, so the emission of b occurs earlier than with debounceTime — as the delay is relative the the receipt of a.

That’s fine. I knew that — that’s what’s in the docs.

What I didn’t know was that the completion behaviour differs.

With debounceTime, if completion occurs within the time window, the operator completes immediately and emits the most-recently-received value. Like this:

debounceTime with completion

With auditTime, if completion occurs within the time window, the operator completes immediately, without emitting the most-recently-received value. Like this:

auditTime with completion

The behaviour is understandable, as the purpose of auditTime is to emit the audited — the most-recently-received — value when it receives a signal from its notifier — the timer. However, the source completes before the operator receives a signal, so there is no final emission.

debouceTime is different. It’s purpose is to emit the most-recently-received value after a source has not emitted notifications for the specified duration. If the source completes, the operator can be sure that no further values will be received and the most-recently-received value can be emitted.

It makes sense, but it wasn’t what I had expected.


Personal blog by Nicholas Jamieson.
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